Dating my teenage daughter

Bruce Cameron is the Dave Barry of modern family life.” —John Temple, Rocky Mountain News W.

Bruce Cameron is a humor writer for the Rocky Mountain News, and his essays appear in Time, Newsday, and on NPR's "Car Talk." He lives in Evergreen, Colorado, with his wife, two teenage daughters, and a teenage son.

In the immediate aftermath of John Ritter’s death, it was hard to take issue with ABC’s decisions, since execs were thrust into an untenable situation.

Since then, however, there has been a vague ghoulishness surrounding the show, including big viewer tune-in for the remaining Ritter episodes and ABC News’ synergistic efforts such as Diane Sawyer’s interview with the actor’s widow, Amy Yasbeck.

When Ritter unexpectedly died in 2003, the producers decided to keep the show going and his character died off-camera on the show. (David Spade), moves into the house’s basement with Grandfather Jim and frustrates him and the rest of the family to no end.

TV show description: Based on the writings of humor author W.

There was nothing surprising about this genial series in happier days, and there was nothing surprising about what one of the ratings hotlines labeled “the death episode.” The hour delivered lots of group hugs, tears and platitudes about the unfairness of such a loss, best delivered by an avuncular James Garner.

The consistent refrain from the network and cast has been “This happens to families,” which is of course true.

Bruce Cameron, this sitcom revolves around the Hennessys, a typical middle class family living in a suburb of Detroit, Michigan.

Sportswriter and father Paul Hennessy (John Ritter) feels guilty about missing out on his children’s’ early years.

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