Dating noritake

("Nippon" literally translates to "Japan".) This porcelain was made specifically to be exported to the west with designs and patterns that suited American's tastes.At that time, Japan had a thriving porcelain industry using methods used in Europe and the United States.This trading company imported chinaware, curios, paper lanterns and other gift items.In 1904, the forerunner of the Noritake Company was established in the village of Noritake, a small suburb near Nagoya, Japan.Noritake has had a complex history, with many backstamps, thousands of designs and unidentified or forgotten patterns rediscovered every year.Keeping up with this information can be overwhelming, but there are a number of excellent online and in-print resources for learning about Noritake china, among them: Noritake porcelain remains one of the most enjoyable areas for new or advanced collectors.Superior artistry and craftsmanship, attention to detail and uncompromising commitment to quality have made Noritake an international trademark during this past century.

They knew that china and porcelain were used in every home for dining, washing up, or displaying the family's good taste with decorative pieces, but European factories had production locked up.The Japanese items were less expensive than pieces coming from Europe and became very popular in the U. The porcelain was sold in gift shops, dime stores, fairs and even at the local grocery.Nippon items were also sold by Montgomery Ward, Sears & Roebuck, mail order houses and other department stores.This allowed the company to control the quality of their goods and designs and ensured that the patterns appealed to U. It took nearly 10 years for the company to develop their fine china, but the result continues to enchant collectors today, and the company still thrives. Customs definition, antiques must be at least 100 years old, so the earliest Noritake pieces are antiques.Noritake china is often referred to as antique, vintage, or collectible, but this terminology can be confusing to a new collector. "Collectible" can be used to mean pieces under 100 years old, and much of Noritake falls under that definition.

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