Teen dating violence domestic violence

In that 2007 survey, 66 percent of boys and 65 percent of girls who were involved in physically aggressive relationships reported mutual aggression.[7] Twenty-eight percent of the girls said that they were the sole perpetrator; 5 percent said they were the sole victim.

These numbers were reversed for the boys: 5 percent said they were the sole perpetrator; 27 percent the sole victim.

The Department of Justice reports that women between the ages of 16 and 24 are at the greatest risk of becoming domestic violence victims.

According to Breakthe Cycle.org, violent relationships during adolescence put the survivors at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior and further domestic violence.

These lessons shouldn’t end when kids leave the playground and become teenagers.

Promoting nonviolent relationships can be a vital step to preventing domestic abuse in adulthood.

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However, 81 percent of parents believe teen dating violence is not an issue, or admit that they don’t know if it’s an issue.

Anna Marjavi, program manager with Futures Without Violence, a national nonprofit aimed at advocacy to end violence against women, says that parents should start having conversations with their teens as early as middle school about what healthy relationships look like. There may be classroom curriculum about it [dating violence], but it’s great when parents can start the conversation.” Marjavi says, if parents spot their teen experiencing what they think could be an unhealthy or even abusive relationship, they need to talk to the teen immediately and express “concern and unwavering love.

According to the 2007 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, approximately 10 percent of adolescents nationwide reported being the victim of physical violence at the hands of a romantic partner during the previous year.[1] The rate of psychological victimization is even higher: Between two and three in 10 reported being verbally or psychologically abused in the previous year, according to the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.[2]As for perpetration rates, there are currently no nationwide estimates for who does the abusing, and state estimates vary significantly.

“To be a man does not mean you have to be violent or bully someone else.

The education starts early on in helping boys get a different understanding of what it means to be a male,” says Vargas.

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